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New York Invasive Species Network

New York has a state-wide management effort for invasive species, with management areas covering all of the state. This comprehensive effort is made possible by coordination among the Invasive Species Council, Invasive Species Advisory Committee, and the regional bodies that manage invasive species (PRISMs).

NYISRI helps to connect it all, as we coordinate research, build networks, and support our partners in this common mission.

0% of NY falls within an invasive species management area

PRISMs

Eight Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management, or PRISMs, cover all of New York State. These organizations are a coordinated effort to manage invasive species in their regions, through invasive species control, outreach and education, volunteer coordination, and early monitoring programs. NYISRI works to build collaborations among the PRISMS, and facilitate research needs and outcomes.

0 Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program
Capital Mohawk PRISM
Long Island Invasive Species Management Area
St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario PRISM
Lower Hudson PRISM
Finger Lakes PRISM
Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership
Western New York PRISM

Governing Organizations

NYISRI collaborates with the NY Invasive Species Council and Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Led by the Department of Environmental Conservation and Department of Agriculture and Markets, the council works to coordinate invasive species efforts among 9 other state agency members. The Advisory Committee seats researchers, conservationists, managers, and other stakeholders to provide guidance to the Council.

ISAC
New York Invasive Species Information
iMap Invasives
DEC
DAM
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 click to visit our researcher database

click to visit our researcher database

Research Connections

NYISRI collaborates with many invasive species research groups across the state. Visit the researcher database to connect with researchers, or join the database yourself!